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Clean up time is a crucial time

Election season is also the season of signs in various communities around America.

It’s a good method for advertising, seeing one bold last name enough may subliminally sway a voter to go one way or another. The signs might also remind the average civilian that election day is approaching.

On the other hand, signs can quickly become an eyesore when not tended to properly. For a two-month period, campaign signs flood our lives, as politicians do all they can to remind you of the impending elections, doing what they can to win your vote. You can’t evade politicians in the newspaper, on TV, on social media and not even when you take a five-minute drive.

Encouraging citizens to use their greatest power to affect change is understandable and part of the political machine. Please, however, clean up the signs quickly after the election. This is good policy and should be enacted by all cities in an effort to maintain clean and clutter-free streets.

The pain of seeing an election sign still standing proudly on the corner of an intersection or popular highway days or weeks after an election equates to the feeling that spreads up a spine when a Christmas tree is visible in a neighbor’s window heading into February. The simple childhood concept cleaning up after ourselves should be held in high regard in all areas of life, including when dealing with campaign signs. This time next week, the final signs, except the races in a runoff, should be out of sight and out of mind.