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A nice, clean campaign

There are those among us who do not like politics. The reasons for this are many, but those that do not care for the endeavor in some cases dislike the negativity associated with the campaign process.

This current election cycle has been especially bad, with many candidates throwing mud at the competition and making accusations, ranging from wild to just plain mean.

Ever since it was announced that the June primary would produce a July runoff, the mudslinging seems to have only amped up for most of the races. Most, but not all.

One of the best examples of how an election should be run is the race between Debbie Wood and Todd Rauch for the State Representative, District 38 seat.

During the lead up to the primary, there were a few moments when Wood’s campaign validity was called into question, but for the most part that race has remained very civil.

When the runoff was announced, both candidates campaigned hard across Chambers and Lee counties. Rauch, notably, mentioned several times that he knocked on more than 5,000 doors in his campaign.

On the night of the runoff, it was clear early on that it was going to be close and many news outlets struggled to determine who was winning.

Both candidates remained civil throughout the process, even when the final tally showed Wood ahead by six votes.

Now both candidates are waiting for provisional ballots to be counted. Still, things have remained civil.

Politics can be a dirty job to get involved with and for many the toll it takes on their personal life is not a cost worth paying.

Thankfully, there are a few examples of how to run a nice, clean campaign.