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CFCP continues to do amazing things

The Chattahoochee Fuller Center Project is continuing to do good work in the local area. Two new homes are going up right now. By mid-October, we will have 42 new homes that have been built since 2007.

That’s a remarkable feat for a community our size and something we need to continue. It’s possible through continued donations and volunteering.

There’s no way many people in the Valley area could ever afford to pay for a new home in the $150,000 to $200,000 price range, but they can afford something new and decent for $60,000 or so.

That’s what can happen through charitable organizations such as the Fuller Center for Housing and Habitat for Humanity. When businesses donate items and people step up to provide volunteer labor this helps keep mortgage payments in the range of people in the low to moderate income group can afford.

We are blessed to have companies like Norbord, which donates OSB, Knauf, which provides insulation, and Coca-Cola, which is good about bringing all the cold drinks volunteer workers need on days it’s in the mid-nineties.

Local churches play a critical role, too. People of faith don’t need much egging on to do good things for their fellow man. We see a lot of that in Fuller Center builds and it’s a constantly uplifting thing.

There’s a special connection between the Chattahoochee Valley and the Fuller Center. This is where founder Millard Fuller was born and grew up. It meant a lot to him for the Valley to be a covenant partner with the Fuller Center.

There’s little question he would be most proud of the way that’s worked out since that night at West Point Depot when serious talk began about having a Fuller Center partner here. Something got started that night back in 2006, and it’s still going strong some 13 years later. We’re fortunate to have had leadership from people like Bill Scott, Curt Johnson and Kim Roberts.

2018 is going down as a pretty good year for the CFCP. Four new homes in one year is a pretty good accomplishment.

In some communities much larger than the Valley, it may take several years for a charitable organization to get one home built.

We’re proud of what the CFCP and its many supporters have accomplished in our community. Let’s stay behind it and work for even better things in the future.