• 63°

Valley High practices safety measures

VALLEY — On Tuesday, Sept. 4, Valley High School went into “secure your area” mode. Also referred to as code orange, secure your area is a precautionary measure that ensures teachers and students are within their classroom with the doors locked.

“That’s our way of keeping kids in the classroom,” Principal Sherry Ashe said. “Teachers can’t let them be released to go to the bathroom, to go to the counselor’s office or any office, they have to keep their doors locked and keep them closed.”

Fortunately, secure your area does not always mean there is a specific threat to be worried about. According to Principal Ashe, code orange is usually called for heightened awareness or to ensure that everyone is accounted for.

“What that means is that there is something going on at the school or some kind of potential threat out in the community in which we would want to keep people in their place,” she said. “We locked everyone in their rooms. We locked the perimeter of our doors so that, should someone try to come into our area, they couldn’t get in. It keeps our children safe.”

Tuesday morning’s call to secure your area came so that a K9 unit could sweep through random classrooms to sniff out any drugs.

Principal Ashe was proud to say that none were found and class carried on normally after approximately 30 minutes.

Code orange could be considered a “mild” alert.  If faculty and staff are instructed to stay vigilant for a minor threat like a school fight or severe weather, code yellow is called.

In the event of an actual threat, the school goes into “lockdown,” or code red.

“If there ever is an immediate threat like if a bad guy was in the school or we knew someone was going to charge in or something like that, then we go on lockdown,” Ashe said.

Using the word “lockdown” is reserved only for extreme situations, though.

“We won’t say that word unless it is the real McCoy,” Principal Ashe continued.

To broadcast the more minor alerts, a signal is sent to teachers on their connected electronic devices. Using the intercom is normally reserved for code red situations, but Principal Ashe said she broadcast during Tuesday’s secure your area in order to emphasize that there was no active threat.

Along with mandatory monthly drills, Ashe said she plans to do more with secure your area precautions in order to educate students and their parents on the level of severity.

She said that students will text or call their parents sometimes in the event of   a code orange, causing more worry than necessary.

“We get better at it every time we do it,” Ashe said. “We will probably do a lot more of code orange because we want the parents to get used to it also. It is not the same thing as the code red’s.

News

Sock Hops returning to Troup High School on Feb. 23

News

Carbon monoxide is a silent killer

News

Fuller Center talks 2019 projects

News

Shelby, Jones vote for funding package

News

Kia celebrates start of production for 2020 Telluride

News

Roanoke woman celebrates her 100th birthday

News

West Point woman charged after alleged accidental shooting

News

Unbreakable bond, Daniel and Otos have a strong bond on and off duty

News

Debris at West Point Lake affecting tourism

News

Six arrested after drug raid in Valley

News

Election sees high voter turnout in LaFayette

News

Alabama bicentennial exhibit opens at library

News

Students honored for poster contest

News

Reid recognized for service in community

News

Labor union accuses Ferguson of displaying racist book in office

News

The Greater Valley Area Chamber of Commerce’s Junior Ambassador Committee helped spread some holiday cheer earlier this week when it passed out Valentine’s Day cards at area nursing homes. The junior ambassador committee is made up of ninth graders through twelfth graders from area high schools. Carrie Royster, marketing and events manager for the chamber, said about 45 students participate in the junior ambassadors. Local elementary school students made the Valentine’s Day cards and the junior ambassador committee took them to the assisted living and nursing homes in the area. Valentine’s Day cards were taken to LaFayette Nursing Home, LaFayette Extended Care, G.H. Lanier Nursing Home, Diversicare, Sylvia Word Manor, Lakewood Senior Living and Valley Park Manor. “I think the importance is having our youth go into the nursing homes,” Royster said. “A lot of times our youth doesn’t get that experience, and the nursing home residents absolutely love having the kids come in and getting to communicate with them.”

News

No outright winner in District B election in LaFayette

News

West Point approves lending library

News

CenterBank changes sign after merger

News

Council candidates speak in Valley

News

Baptist Women’s Group hosts monthly meeting

News

Long serving K9 for Troup County Sheriff’s Office passes away

News

State anniversary exhibit in Chambers County this month

News

Newt’s is back in business