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Valley City Council adopts five-year resurfacing plan

VALLEY — The Valley City Council has adopted a five-year plan for resurfacing city streets. It includes 13 city streets and involves more than $1.6 million in costs. Some of the streets will be resurfaced in the near future.

The list includes the following streets with estimated costs in parenthesis: Cleveland Road ($150,000) the portion of Columbus Road from School Street to McGinty’s Crossing ($280,000); Towel Avenue ($195,000); Whitesmill Road ($185,000); Boulevard ($125,000); 26th Avenue ($122,000), Williams Street ($120,000); 65th Street E ($86,000); 61st Street ($80,000); 31st Avenue ($76,000); Hopewell Road ($66,000); 56th Street ($58,000); Harmon Street ($45,000); 14th Place E ($34,000) and an unnamed street in Fairfax ($16,500).

In other action at Monday’s meeting of the city council, three properties were declared public nuisances and authorized for abatement. They are located at 2201 58th Street, 1065 Gibson Street and on 20th Avenue.

Code Enforcement Office Reid Riley said that the city had been cutting the grass on the 58th Street property over the past three years. A house on the lot had gotten in really bad shape. Notices have been sent to the property owner that the house and lot needed to be in better condition but that no response had been received. Riley recommended the city go ahead and abate the site. The dilapidated house will be torn down and the site cleaned up. A lien can then be filed on the property to recover the cost of the cleanup.

The site on 20th Avenue is owned by A&E LLC. Riley said the owner had at one time expressed interest in cleaning up the property. He had asked him for a plan of action to do that but the owner had not responded.

“There’s been no work done on this house, and it’s in bad shape,” Riley said. “It’s one of the worst I have seen in a while. Part of the roof is collapsing.”

Riley recommended taking action to bring it down and clean up the site. The council agreed.

Riley said the house on Gibson Street was also in poor condition. The windows have been boarded up, a deck had rotted off and the main structural beam was about to give way. The property owner had been notified to do something but had not responded. Riley recommended abatement, and the council agreed.

In other action, the council adopted an online privacy policy applicable to the city’s web site. It’s designed to comply with existing regulations. If the action is deemed appropriate, the city could hire technical assistance to ensure that the website fully complies with all existing statutes, rules and regulations.

The council approved permitting public consumption of alcoholic beverages at three upcoming events: a wedding reception at Lakeview Cabin on Oct. 3, another wedding reception at Lakeview on Oct. 24, an event there on Nov. 7, and a wedding reception at Lakeview on Dec. 5.

The council renewed a lease agreement with the Chambers County Multi-Jurisdictional Task Force for an estimated 3,000-square-foot section of a city-owned building on Fairfax Bypass. The contract will run from Oct. 1, 2020, until September 30, 2021. The city will receive $300 a month for leasing part of the building.